Grilled Peaches

arrow_backBack to Recipes restaurantMore from Desserts restaurant_menuCurrent Recipe of the Week
Ingredients:

4-5 ripe firm peaches, cut into halves and pits removed
1/4 cup (50 mL) granulated sugar
2 tbsp (25 mL) lemon juice
4 cups (1 L) vanilla ice cream
1 lb (450 g) raspberries, fresh or frozen
1/2 cup (125 mL) granulated sugar, or more to taste
1 tbsp (15 mL) lemon juice, or more to taste
1 cup (250 mL) raspberry sauce (recipe follows) or jam
8 citrus crisps or graham cookies

Preparation:

1. Preheat gas grill to high. If you are using a charcoal grill, build a fire and let it burn down until the coals are glowing red with a light coating of white ash. Spread the coals in an even bed. Clean cooking grate.

2. Toss peaches with sugar and lemon juice.

3. Grill peaches over direct heat until tender in the middle and well marked, 3 to 4 minutes per side.

4. Serve peaches over vanilla ice cream, topped with raspberry sauce and garnished with citrus crisps or graham cookies.

Makes 8 servings.

Nutrition facts per serving: about 448 calories; 13.6 grams fat; 3.8 grams protein; 82.9 grams carbohydrates; 5.7 grams fiber

Raspberry sauce
1. In a saucepan over medium heat, combine raspberries, sugar and lemon juice. Simmer, stirring, until sugar has dissolved, about 10 minutes. Strain sauce through a fine-mesh sieve. Add additional sugar and/or lemon juice to taste, if desired.

2. Serve immediately or store in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

Makes 2 cups (500 mL).

Note: grilling caramelizes the natural sugar of fruit, which makes them sweeter and more flavourful. It also softens their texture and helps fruit to release more juices.

Stone fruit, such as peaches, nectarines and plums, do particularly well on the grill. They're firm enough to be placed directly on the cooking grate and sturdy enough to remain intact when turned over for charring.

Fruits are apt to pick up unwanted flavours from the grill, so it's especially important to clean the grate before placing the peaches on it. They'll cook quickly, so a brisk, hot fire is best.

Keep a close watch: A little smoke and charring are good, but the natural sugars in the peaches are prone to burning. Too much blackening will result in a bitter taste. As soon as grill marks appear, turn them to finish cooking.

The peaches are done when the flesh is soft and tender.

If you plan to make dinner on the grill as well as dessert, you'll want to keep the fire hot enough to cook the peaches after the main entree is served and eaten. Since most of the components for the dessert -- the ice cream, raspberry sauce and citrus crisps -- can be purchased or prepared in advance, you will need to plan for just a few minutes of grill time.